Friday, July 17, 2015

BLACK WOOLY BEAR CATERPILLAR

These are all over the farm.  

Not sure what they grow up to be when the cycle is complete, but it's always fun watching nature do its thing.


I do believe though that if you touch these, they cause a severe rash with raised welts.  I seem to recall a childhood incident with one, but not sure if it was this. 

Black Wooly Caterpillar 
I'm NOT going to take a chance and find out.  I just left them alone, they weren't on any important plants, just on the weeds and grasses around the property.

Caterpillar 
They are kind of pretty to see and imagining the transformation that they will soon be going through is fascinating.  

Nature truly is amazing...

18 comments:

Jacquelineand.... said...

They turn into the Isabella tiger moth; rather a pretty wee thing... but, yeah, contact dermatitis is a hazard with woolly bears. Funny, when I was growing up we called them woolly worms; I like your name better.

donna baker said...

Come on. Touch it. I found one similar in my garden bed and the fur was spines. My baby daughter was bitten by a white furry one in Houston which I found out later was an asp. It just fell out of a tree while I was strolling her. It hurt her terribly so watch out for furry white ones.

jaz@octoberfarm said...

if they are all black with no stripes you are supposed to have a cold winter.

Colleen said...

When in doubt; it's always best to leave well enough alone.
Top 10 Dangerous Caterpillars ................ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erDB78XlACQ

Why are Hickory Tussock (white) Caterpillars so irritating? http://biologybizarre.blogspot.com/2014/08/why-are-hickory-tussock-caterpillars-so.html

https://www.google.com/search?q=dangers+of+Caterpillars&biw=1280&bih=628&site=webhp&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0CGAQsARqFQoTCIqcjfDS4sYCFUPVgAodRNcLlA&dpr=1.5

Elephant's Child said...

I have had a run in with a similar beastie over here. I itched for days and days and days. And had a v attractive red welt.
Caution is definitely the smart option. They are beautiful though.

FionaG said...

I wouldn't be touching it for love nor money. We get caterpillar on our citrus trees. When the kids were young, we would put a couple in a large jar and keep them fed till they turned into a cacoon and then we would wait for them to emerge as butterflies. It was a fantastic experience watching that cycle happen before our eyes.

Gail said...

That last picture is just gorgeous but I am partial to purple. Great shots of all.

Texas Rose said...

You took some beautiful photos!

“Texas Insect Identification: Find Your Insect or Submit a Photo”: http://texashighplainsinsects.net/

Sadie J said...

Maybe we have different "wooly worms" here in Illinois. I've picked them up plenty of times with no problem.

1st Man said...

Really? Thank you for that info!! Wooly worms huh? Yep, I grew up only knowing them as wooly bears that's funny. I love how the same things in other places have different names.

1st Man said...

LOL! Not gonna do it! ;-) I have heard of those white ones, haven't seen one, YET, anyway, but yes, hears those are dangerous too.

1st Man said...

Really? I love old stories like that, there is knowledge in those old tales.

1st Man said...

I'm going to call you the information queen. Thank you for these links. I always save them in my "farm" bookmarks on my system. Thank you! And yes, they are kind of scary huh?

1st Man said...

They have them down there? Yes, I seem to recall me having a raised red welt. And it stung and itched as well. They are pretty and it's neat to watch. Just from a distance, ha.

1st Man said...

Now that would be fun to watch the cycle. Might have to do that for ourselves someday. Very cool. You area great Mom! ;-)

1st Man said...

Ha, thank you. Purple? I'll have to remember that. ;-)

1st Man said...

Thank you and thank you for this link. I am putting it in my bookmarks folder. Thank you!!

1st Man said...

Really? I guess there are some that are safer, I will have to do some research. I've love to pick them up but tend to err on the side of caution, ha.