Monday, March 2, 2015

GROVE OF TREES ID

Since the weekend was cold, wet, and nasty, there wasn't much I could do outside.  I went back through some photos I took a few months ago and wanted to share these...  

This is something we'd like to keep and turn into something special.  It's a grove of trees that we've only ever seen from a distance.  It sits near the natural pond site.  Until a few months ago, we couldn't ever get this close.  But thanks to "R" from 2nd Family and his tractor with brush hog, he cleared out all around the pond site and now we can walk right over to them.

Grove of Trees
Anyone hazard to guess what kind of trees they are?  

There aren't any others like them on the property.  In the middle of Winter of course, with all the leaves dropped off, it might be a bit difficult, but hopefully someone can lead us down the right path...so to speak, LOL.  They are tall and thin and the branches grow kind of up at an angle as you can see below.


Now that we can walk 'into' it, we love it even more.  They have grown in such a way that they've created a sort of secret garden that we see much potential in.  Table?  Chairs?  Hammock?  Sure, it needs some cleaning up so you can stand up and walk around with having to duck your head but otherwise it's almost more of a 'woodland' type area.  We could see ferns and other shade loving plants and flowers (bulbs?) growing.  

This grove of trees is a wholly unique spot on the entire property and those we have to nourish and encourage. 

Secret Garden
By the way, the pond site we don't 'believe' is spring fed, we think it's just the right combination of clay soil and depression in the ground to hold water.  Someday, we will have the pond site dug out and built up around it and then filled with water.  And of course we'll stock it with fish.  

And then, this spot will have a 'waterfront' view...


23 comments:

donna baker said...

I thought they were birch until I saw the bark. Perhaps they are just small trees as farmers used to brush hog all the pasture trees down for livestock. Check with the county extension service where your farm is located. Ours offer to build ponds (government backed) and pay up to 2/3 of the cost. We have 3 on our farm and they are stocked with fish. Only thing I would have done different, is leave an island in the middle of the pond for waterfowl to overnight. Coyotes can't get them and you won't have to bother with locking them up every night.

rheather said...

I'm thinking hackberry. The trunks look like they're getting lumpy(from climbing trees as a kid, you can get a good knee grip on the knobby bark but you lose skin if you slide!) Are there oval with a pointy tip leaves on the ground still?

The are planted by bird poop and these look like they've been cut back once and resprouted from the original stump-also a hackberry trait.

Practical Parsimony said...

I was going to mention that the leaves on the ground might give you a clue. Birch or aspen? To maintain the secret garden aspect, leave certain branches growing low. You can see out, but others cannot see in. Years ago, I started putting benches in various areas of my 1/3 acre yard. Then, I realized the reason I added seating was to have a place to rest as my back problem became worse. This group of trees would provide respite from the sun and heat. I love it.

Colleen said...

Oh to me , that looks like it could be a very nice Wildlife Refuge. Build some birdhouse; ( owl houses, bat houses, wrens, robins, etc.) along with different variety of bird feeders of sorts and put up all around that area..
You will be amazed eventually by the different types of birds that will flock in along with other wild creatures.

Elephant's Child said...

Love them.
Until I saw the bark I also though silver birch.
It will be a wonderful haven of peace when you have finished.

FionaG said...

I think a seat or a gazebo in the midst would be lovely. I say a gazebo because sometimes sitting in such a setting in the rain can be really peaceful and beautiful, particularly if it is a passing shower in summer or spring. In regards to the trees I too thought Silver Birch but the bark on the trunk looks pine like but pine trees aren't deciduous. Perhaps they are Popplers

Texas Rose said...

Isn’t it fun to explore and discover another hidden gem on your property?! (And how great it is to have a neighbor with a brush hog!)
That is going to be such a beautiful, peaceful spot. As others said, this area is calling out for a couple of benches and a hammock or two. What a perfect spot to observe and enjoy nature in the woods and by/in the pond!

Here are some sites that may help you identify the trees:
http://texastreeid.tamu.edu/content/idByLeaf/
http://www.arborday.org/trees/whattree/
http://www.texastreetrails.org/treeguide/treeguide.htm
http://woodlandstrees.blogspot.com/2008/07/tree-identification-by-bark.html

Ian's Girl said...

I'm one state to the east of you, and I just want to make sure you're aware that many snakes like the water, so you need to be careful where you step! Do y'all have water moccasins in Texas? We have them in Arkansas, and they're poisonous and more aggressive than your average snake.

Had to say without the leaves, but your tree kind of looks like a poplar to me They like wetter areas.

Audra Russell said...

I just love reading your posts. I will have my own farm one day and reading about your journey keeps my hope stirred. Keep it coming!

1st Man said...

I kind of thought they were birch too from far away. What about ponds? Seriously they can help with the cost? This was way down our list (due to cost) but if we could get 2/3 of i helped, wow, that would be nice. That's our wish is to have it stocked with fish. I suppose I should do some research on that. Thank you much. And it's funny you mentioned an island...in my 'dream' of a pond, I wanted an island just because I thought it would be a nice feature but the waterfowl overnighting there would be wonderful. Never thought about that. Thank you! Now I'm off to do some googling about the ponds, ha.

1st Man said...

Hackberry? Don't tell me that, I hate those junky trees, ha. No leaves that I can remember what they looked like anyway, I'll check in the Spring and see what happens. Thank you!!

1st Man said...

I like that idea to keep some of the branches low...great thought, thanks!! I want to put benches around the property too. I just like to stop and enjoy it occasion. And I might have back problems at some point as well. Thank you, and yes a great thought about a nice break from the heat.

1st Man said...

Oooh, good ida there too. Thanks!!! And yes, it would bring in a bunch of wildlife huh? Cool! thanks!!!

1st Man said...

It definitely will be nice someday. It's still further down the list but it doesn't hurt to dream, right? Thank you!!

1st Man said...

There is another spot nearby that would be perfect for a gazebo, someday anyway. But definitely a bench of some sort, maybe some adirondack type chairs? Well, maybe that's getting ahead of things, better for the pond to see about that but hey, a bench for now once it's cleaned up, it would be nice. Poplar is an idea. I might have to just wait until Spring when the leaves come in.

1st Man said...

Oh yes, isn't the brush hog nice? He actually borrows it from another neighbor but it's his whenever he wants it. So anytime he comes, I ask "hey, do you mind....." and he loves doing it so hey, who am I to argue, right? Ha. Thanks for the links, you always get the best....I will add them to my bookmarks. Thanks!!!

1st Man said...

Oh YES! thank you for the reminder. We do have water moccasins and a couple others. Funny you mentioned that, I just got a snake guide for snakes of SE texas, more on that in another post). We're very careful when walking.

Poplar is a good suggestion, so is hackberry, I"ll just have to check in the Spring I think. Thanks again for the snake reminder!!!

1st Man said...

Aww, thanks for that. It's a slow process...but we're enjoying it and enjoy documenting it. If we inspire someone else, that's even more special than we could have hoped for. Thank you again!!! :-)

Audra Russell said...

I'm always reading...never posted before but truly enjoy your blog. On days when I think I won't ever have a farm, I just come here and think "if they can make it happen, so can I!"

dindin said...

hackberry is really a very nice tree. hard wood and quite hardy. well suited for our area of texas. when even the mesquite die from drought the hacks are still going strong. lots of nice birds and critters rely on them as well

Ulrika said...

I too think it's hackberry. (Had to google that first though,to see which tree it is in Swedish).

Not birch, that I am sure of.

Your farm seems so lovely!!

1st Man said...

It DOES do well here, that's for sure. And yep, they all made it through the drought. I will have to check them out more closely next time it's warm and dry, ha.

1st Man said...

Well, hello! And welcome! Thank you for the kind words! It's a (slow) work in progress, ha. Thanks for letting us know about the tree. Don't be a stranger, come back soon!!