Monday, October 26, 2015

WE LOVE MARIGOLDS

Now that the flooding downpours are gone, time to get back to important stuff...like flowers!  When I pulled up to the farm last weekend to work on the raised beds, even way down at 2nd Family's house, I looked toward our house and I saw color!  Lots of it!











These are the marigolds we planted last Spring.  They did great all Spring and Summer but now they have exploded in this cooler weather and seem to be growing even faster.  We love it!






The beds are overflowing with marigolds.  Of course, we planted them along the edge of the flower bed so they are all hanging over into the yard.  Another plus is they smell so good too (I know not everyone likes the smell but we sure do).








They are even springing up elsewhere...this is not one I planted, it is a volunteer that came up on the other side of the stairs in a not yet completed flower bed!  Seed blew over?  Bird dropped it?  Somehow it popped up!

It's a riot of color and we only bought yellow and orange!  Now we know one flower for sure that does VERY well in our heat and since I only watered on the weekends, they are drought tolerant too.  But we don't know much else about marigolds and while I know I can Google info, we like firsthand info from people who have had experience with them. 

Anyone have some "marigold advice"? 

Are there other colors?  Varieties?
Growing tips?


28 comments:

anne marie in philly said...

loving the autumnal colors!

jaz@octoberfarm said...

my marigold were terrific this year too. there are lots of varieties. i especially like the ones that are both yellow and orange together.

Anne in the kitchen said...

My advice for marigolds is to just plant them everywhere, collect the seeds and plant them again next year. They are fantastic flowers to have at a 2nd home, because they can tolerate a ton of neglect. Next year, other than knock out roses (another tolerant plant) I am only planting marigolds and zinnias at the lake. They do perfectly fine without me being there all the time.

Anonymous said...

there is a white marigold. French or Vanilla in the name??? large and fluffy white. very pretty.

Practical Parsimony said...

I love self-seeding flowers.

Texas Rose said...

LOVE your marigolds! They have really thrived for y'all. Marigolds are some of my favorite summer flowers also - they provide such beautiful color without much effort. With the old-fashioned, non-hybrid ones, you can save the seeds and plant the next year.
I want to get into companion planting. Marigolds are supposed to deter some insects and nematodes, and also be beneficial for cucumbers, kale, squash, potatoes, and tomatoes.

Texas Rose said...

Oops, Blogger must be acting up - my comment got published as a reply.

Anonymous said...

Marigolds are one of the easiest flowers to grow if well cared after.
Deadheading Marigolds
By deadheading you will have much prettier blooms and bushier plants; Plus will have seed to save and plant for another year. Marigolds also look good in hanging baskets and / or pots. Deadheading is the removal of blossoms as soon as they start to fade, before they produce seeds. Deadheading is a practice that prevents flowers from putting energy into seed production and allows them to put more energy into creating even more blossoms. Deadheading may be done immediately after planting to encourage the plants to produce newer, fresher flowers, or deadheading may be done after the blossoms begin to fade.
Examine the marigold plants for fading flowers. Look for brown curling tips on the petals or the formation of green centers in the flowers. The green center is the beginning development of a seed pod. If the marigold plants form seeds, they will stop blooming.
Follow the flower stem down to the first set of leaves. This is the best place to deadhead the flower. Cut the stalk with hand pruners or snap the stalk off. Do not damage the leaves. This area will produce more flowers and stems.
Pinch back stems that are growing weak or too long. This will encourage bushy growth, and the plant will produce more flower buds. Remove any diseased or damaged stems, leaves or flowers. Place the removed plant parts on the compost pile.
To encourage growth and a strong root system, dissolve a tablespoon of 9-45-15 fertilizer in a gallon of water, and use this to water your marigolds for the first time.
You don't want to over fertilize. Giving too much fertilizer to marigolds stimulates the growth of green leaves rather than flowers. Marigolds actually produce more blooms in poor soil.
Lay your seed heads out on paper plates or paper towels and allow to dry. Once good and dry store in brown paper bag or large brown envelope.
You don't want to store any kind of seeds in plastic cause they could mold.
Pictures of dried marigold seeds. https://www.google.com/search?q=dried+marigold+seed+pods&biw=1280&bih=628&site=webhp&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0CBwQsARqFQoTCKyLtvnw4MgCFVbBYwodxdwL0Q.
Yes, they will produce many seeds for you in years to come.
ColleenB.~Texas

Galestorm said...

Mine are still doing well too, but not as showy as yours. I also plant them in the vegetable garden.

Anonymous said...

Being I have a hard time commenting with Google I'm coming in as; Anonymous.
ColleenB.

Anonymous said...

Oh, forgot to mention that marigolds are a great to plant around your tomato plants and by your front door to help keep insects away.
ColleenB.

Midnite Baker said...

Gorgeous flowers!! And I was going to tell you the same thing as Anonymous. M

Tewshooz said...

I love marigolds and their cousins calendulas. So cheerful looking. And they grow anywhere and especially love hot dry climates. Beautiful

1st Man said...

It's such a happy flower huh? The yellow and orange are pretty for sure.

1st Man said...

I like that advice! And thanks for the tips. I haven't tried knockout roses but I'm familiar with them. Zinnias I haven't tried either. But I know the knockout roses are all over Houston in parking lot plantings, esplanades, etc, so they must take neglect. Heck, I can water them at least once a week...the marigolds are getting weekly waterings and are happy. Zinnia I'll have to google and learn about them. Thank you for the tips (any others you get for 2nd home plantings, let us know, ;-) )

1st Man said...

White??? Really? That's cool I will look for them. .

1st Man said...

Texas Rose - It's ok, blogger does that at times. Poor Colleen is having all sorts of weird problems and I can't figure out why. I forgot about seed saving them. I will do that for sure. And scatter them around and see what happens. And I've heard about the companion planting, I'd love them all around the garden in the beds I just made. Too bad they don't grow in the winter. Though in our winters, who knows, ha.

1st Man said...

It's neat isn't it? They just multiply with no effort. I love that too!!

1st Man said...

Colleen, you are awesome as always. Thank you SO much for this valuable information!! I did do some deadheading a month or so ago and they just exploded. That's probably what happened. And if they do well in poor soil, then that might be another explanation, ha.

Thanks so much for the links and info. Off to check out the google search you linked to.

1st Man said...

Do they seem to help the veggies? I guess if they keep some bugs and nasty critters off and away, that's all that matters. Plus they are pretty huh?

1st Man said...

I have heard about the tomatoes, but didn't know that about front door. This bed is actually right at the corner bed between the two sets of stairs to the front porch. That's pretty close to the front door, ha.

1st Man said...

Thank you for that!!! They are pretty (and we have color!!)

1st Man said...

I didn't know calendulas were cousins. Cool! We have a dry climate (except this past weekend, ha). Thank you!!

Practical Parsimony said...

Not all marigolds repel insects. French marigolds are the ones that work.

jessie said...

I plant mine every year in my vegetable garden and I've never had a problem with bugs. It could be coincidental, but I love having them among the vegetables. They looks so pretty.

1st Man said...

Cool, thanks for that info! We learn something new every day, ha.!!

1st Man said...

Jessie, that's awesome, thank you. I am thinking of putting them all around the garden as well. Great advice and sounds like it works. Even if coincidental, heck it's pretty, right?

Anonymous said...

Plant Snapdragons and Pansies too - they love this cooler weather