Tuesday, October 11, 2016

BAY LAUREL TREE

This is the bay laurel tree we blogged about a while back. 



 It had some leaf damage after this photo was taken and so we planted it into a larger, clay pot.

Bay Laurel tree
It's growing nicely in its spot and sprouting out new branches.  I'd like to plant it in the ground but not sure how well it would do. I know they are very slooooooow growing so maybe the large clay pot is better for awhile.  

Fresh bay leaves
This past weekend, 2nd Man asked me to bring some leaves home.  I wasn't sure where to cut them off but I chose the bottom of the plant and took some from there.  While I was at the farm, I left them in this basket in the sunshine where they dried nicely and now they are in a small jar waiting to be used.

Anyone have any Bay leaf tips?


24 comments:

Colleen said...

zones 5 through 9 outdoors and 4 through 11 on a patio
Growing in pots you will need to put it in a slightly shaded area; away from direct heat from the sun

requires little maintenance. They can withstand high temperatures and thrive in in both full and partial sunlight. There Mediterranean heritage gives them drought tolerance and the ability to quickly adapt to most soil types. It grows 1-2 feet each year, reaching a mature height of 10-15 feet.

The shrub is also pest-resistant so there's no need to worry about spraying pesticides. In fact, the plant's natural oils will also deter pests from other nearby plants. It also has a high resistance to disease and will settle in your landscape for years to come.

Fresh or dried Bay Laurel leaves can be used as a cooking spice, which is often added to traditional Mediterranean dishes such as soups, stews and fish dishes. Their mild flavor enhances the taste of vegetables, meat, and poultry. The dried leaves retain their flavor for several months.

If chance of frost it will need to be brought indoors.  It's unlikely to flower or bear fruit if grown in container. You can leave sweet bay out during the warmer months and grow it as a houseplant when there is danger of frost. When you set it out in the spring, acclimate it to the sun incrementally by one hour per day to avoid burning the leaves.

http://yougrowgirl.com/growing-bay-laurel-in-a-pot/

donna baker said...

Mine grew about 10 feet tall and lush, but in zone 7, had to overwinter in the greenhouse. miss it so. Google Logee's Tropical Plants and it will give you all the instructions. I've got an entire greenhouse full of plants from there.

Linda said...

I wonder if I can cook with my cherry laurel. It has survived -9 degrees! and over 100 degrees.
pparsimony

Elephant's Child said...

Ours is now taller than the house. And its leaves have graced many, many dishes.

Texas Rose said...

I planted a small one about 2 years ago. It is growing very slowly. But it is drought tolerant.
Good idea about drying the leaves in the sun!

jaz@octoberfarm said...

i have about 4 of these planted in pots. i bring them in during the winter. they grow like crazy and don't need much attention. i use them all the time!

Debbie Nichol said...

just a second hand storey. Friends were holidaying in France and while they were out walking came across they most amazing smell. A bit further on they found the source, a gentleman was busily hedge trimming his hedge...of bay trees! They asked if they could have a few leaves, and he said take them all..terrible tree! They filled what bags they had with them, and then filled pages of books and mailed them home.

Anne in the kitchen said...

I am planning on getting one for the lake place. I think I can plant it in an area that is shielded from the winds , but will still get plenty of sunlight. I had a friend who had one in her front yard and it is only about 30 miles south of the lake. The growing conditions should be very similar.

Dc said...

Mine is now 3' tall. I have just removed loads of suckers and 'raised its canopy' same as trees as it was getting a bit round. I am growing it as a shrub, so far! I leave it on n the garden all year but wrap it heavily with garden fleece when colder weather arrives. Mind you, I don't think we get as cold as you.

Leigh said...

Very interesting because I know nothing about bay laurel. I've wondered about growing it though. Maybe if I ever get a greenhouse.

Anonymous said...

an old English way of using them is to add a leaf to rice pudding cooked in the oven, creates a very delicate, but interesting flavour.

1st Man said...

Awesome info (as per usual, ha!). I do notice that it doesn't even fade when I miss watering it for two weeks, even in the pot.

1st Man said...

10 feet tall? In a pot? That's great. Maybe I need a bigger pot. It's growing but just not very fast.

1st Man said...

Hmm, that's intersting. You'd definitely want to google that. I bet it's pretty!!!

1st Man said...

WOW! That's amazing. Not sure our climate is conducive to that but I wished! That's like a lifetime supply of bay leaves, ha.

1st Man said...

The leaves dried nicely in just a day (I had to move it around to stay in the sun and then I flipped them a few times. 2nd Man has already used a couple. I think we're going to need a bigger tree, ha.

1st Man said...

Awesome. I think maybe I need a bigger pot, and/or put it in a bit more sun. 2nd Man loves having the leaves for sure. .

1st Man said...

A HEDGE of bay? WOW! What a great story for sure, that's a lifetime supply right there, ha. And in the pages of books to ship, that's brilliant too. Thanks for sharing!!!

1st Man said...

You should be able to do it, it's worth a try. And keeping them in a pot for awhile will at least let you have it and get a headstart. :-)

1st Man said...

We don't get as cold, most of our freezes are upper 20's for a limited amount of time. We'll see. So yours is in the ground? I think our clay soil is just too much for it, but I am thinking of upping the pot size just to give it more room to grow. Thanks!!

1st Man said...

To be honest, we never thought about it either, but 2nd Man suggested it for the use of its leaves and it's been good so far. Just need to research on best way to grow it.

I think greenhouses are on everyone's someday list, huh? HA!!!

1st Man said...

Really? Wow, thanks for this. I LOOOOVE rice pudding, I'd be willing to try that. Might have to google it to make sure we don't overdo it, ha. Thanks again!!

Galestorm said...

I've had one in a container for years. I would say at least 15 to 20 years. I leave it out on the patio year round. I've repotted it a few times. I pretty much neglect it. Part of it died out and I just cut the dead away. So far, it's still going strong. I also put the dried leaves in my cabinets. I read somewhere that it was a bug deterrent. I think bay laurel grows wild here. I grew up on farm and when I was a young girl they put bay laurel in the lard when they killed hogs. I think, I'm not sure, that it was to help keep the lard from going rancid.

1st Man said...

Really??? Wow!! maybe I'll just pot it up into a larger pot and leave it alone. in 20 years we'll be 70, bay leaves might be be as important by then, LOL! I've heard of the bug deterrent. I might get another sometime to just stick in the ground and see what happens and then use leaves from it for experimenting. Fascinating, thanks!!!