Wednesday, February 22, 2017

FRESH TURMERIC

Recently, we saw something we've never seen at the store...this giant pile of...um...wait...what are they?


They looked like worms or larvae of some sort...


It's Turmeric!  

We've used it as a spice of course but I can honestly say we've never known what it looked like in its natural form and we've certainly never thought about using it "fresh" like this.  We're used to a powder in the spice cabinet but not sure how to use it if it were grated or minced.  They are very lightweight so while they seem expensive, a pound would be a LOT.  A few pieces would be fine. Of course we didn't buy them at the time and when I went back a week later, they were gone!  Seasonal I guess?  

We'll keep looking for them and give them a try.

Anyone ever try it like this?

26 comments:

  1. You can grow it easily and get your sets at Logee's Tropical Plants out of Connecticut. I have also grown ginger and froze it. I don't like the taste of turmeric so daughter got the lot. I grew it in a large butter bean pan and it did well. I do take it in capsule form as it has anti-angiogenesis properties. I have ordered so much from Logee's. You can order their catalog online or shop online. Best plant selections I have found.

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    1. I had no idea, thanks for this info. I've heard it's very healthy....will have to look into that, thanks for the info. And I'm going to check out that website.

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  2. i get fresh turmeric all year long here. it's very healthy for you.

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    1. Thanks, I'm going to have to see if there are some other places here in town, maybe the foreign markets we have. Thanks!

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  3. I also saw some roots in my last cal store and bought some. Shoved them in the soil of a raised bed and now they are growing beautifully πŸ˜‰

    Google "using fresh turmeric..." πŸ˜€

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    1. Awesome that they grow so easily will definitely check that out. Thank you.

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  4. Hi, you can grate them and add salt and lime juice. It may taste a little pungent but its very healthy. This is one way to eat fresh turmeric root.

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  5. I take a teaspoon of powdered turmeric every day for joint pains, works a treat. Mix with oil and add black pepper, good for lots of things.
    Briony
    x

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    1. You mean it actually works??? I eat fresh ginger for the same purpose, maybe that tastes better???

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    2. I actually make a paste that lasts for a week. Both my husband and myself mix 1 teaspoon of the paste into 3 teaspoons of yoghurt and take this twice a day,( it amounts to about 1 teaspoon of powder but is nicer to take) yes it works for us to ease the joint pains and I actually feel better for it. Look it up on Google or try the turmeric group on facebook.

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    3. Wow, joint pain huh? Thanks Briony, that's very interesting to know. Now that we're both in our 50's it might be more important to focus on things like that.

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    4. Fairtrader, I hadn't heard of that for fresh ginger either. I have heard it's great (ginger) for upset stomachs too. Thanks for this info!!

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    5. Oh, you are welcome! It has to do with fighting the inflammation. Dried and grinded rose hip is a best seller for aching joints, it works too. You'll find it in every healthstore. I'll look for turmeric!! I'm turning 54 with both artritis and a metal hipbone, things can only get better!!!

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  6. fresh turmeric is fantastic! as Dani said - you can grow them from roots that you buy from the store. look for turmeric roots that have little yellow nubs on them and cut off a chunk of turmeric (that has the nub) and plant it - it's the same with ginger. turmeric, especially fresh, is as good for you as garlic/ginger/onion. and you can dry your fresh grown to make your own dried spice for the times of the year when it dies back. we love turmeric - fresh turmeric is very much like horseradish or wasabi in taste.

    sending much love to you both! your friend,
    kymber

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    1. Awesome, thanks!!! I will have to see if it likes our weather here. Thanks again, I'm all for something that tastes good and is healthy. :-)

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  7. Never us it.
    How to buy, store and use fresh turmeric:
    https://food52.com/blog/12073-fresh-turmeric-and-why-you-should-be-eating-more-of-it

    How to grow turmeric:
    http://www.gardeningblog.net/how-to-grow/turmeric/

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  8. Ugh, they look disgusting, at first I thought they were Jerusalem artichokes. Turmeric is today a very flashy spice. In the healthy world it is said that this is what you must eat to fight everything from common flu to artritis. I just know it makes the dish yellow. Does it have a taste, 1st Man, spicy?? Hm, a serious lack of culinar knowledge , bad thing for a countryside minister, don't you think?

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    1. Fairtrader - turmeric looks almost exactly like jerusalem artichokes and ginger - and is soooo very good for you! mediterraneans, near eastern, middle eastern, far eastern, thai, phillipono, etc. cultures have eaten it for medicinal benefits for thousands of years. it does make a dish yellow - but yellow is a good colour! fresh turmeric is very spicy - but not like a hot-hot spice - just a vibrant spice. if you like fresh ginger and fresh garlic, you should like fresh turmeric. if you like dried ginger and dried garlic, you should like dried turmeric. and the health benefits of fresh/dried turmeric have been documented by ayervedic/zorastrian/hindu/qi gong and various other cultures for thousands of years.

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    2. Ha, Fairtrader it does look odd that's for sure. It does have a great spicy taste when it's dried and used as a seasoning. Not too spicy though just a great flavor. I would almost say it's like a Saffron type flavor. And yes, it DOES color the dish yellow just the same. And you don't need culinary knowledge, at least not a bunch of it, just learn as you go, that's the best way!

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    3. Kymber thanks for this info, great description. You rock!!!

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  9. Wow 1st Man, you really started something with this post - I did not know tumeric was good for joint pain but I just learned it here & now! The end joints on the first 2 fingers of each hand & my thumbs have been getting more & more arthritic - now I'm going to try some tumeric & see if it helps the pain & stiffness for me.
    With our short growing season (in comparison to yours) I doubt I could get it going, but I hope you guys will let us know how it turns out if you give it a go.

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    1. We did learn too! That's some great info, we have stiff joints on occasion and I"m very interested in this as well. Might just have to try it out, and yes, will definitely keep y'all posted. Thanks for the comment!!!!

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  10. That is the same price as Publix. I bought a piece about six inches long and it cost me $.38. So, for me it is doable. You can plant the store bought. Just pick out pieces that have started to put out little bumps. There are lots of pictures and instructions online as to how to grow it. Publix will take a large piece and cut off what you want, price tag the piece. You don't need a special bed for it. Stick it in a pot at your apartment or someplace in a bed of other things, even flowers.

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    1. I'm going to look into this. Thanks, I was thinking of a flower bed too, that would be easy to just stick in the soil and it gets watered when the other stuff gets watered too. Hmm, maybe around the fruit trees? I'll have to check that out. Make sure it's ok as a companion. Thanks for the info!!

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