Friday, February 3, 2017

FLOWER BUCKETS ON FENCE, INSPIRATION FRIDAY

OOPS!  I SCHEDULED THIS FOR 9:00 YESTERDAY...
...PM INSTEAD OF AM !!!

So for this week, today will be Inspiration FRIDAY...


------------------------------

Every Thursday we like to post a picture of something we've found online that inspires us to do something similar at the farm.  
Sort of our own blog bulletin board so that we can eventually look back and, hopefully anyway, recreate it...enjoy!

Flower plantings on fence, image via Pinterest.com
Stumbled across this while wasting time , killing time, researching Pinterest.  When we saw it, we realized that while all of the fencing along the front yard and driveway is barbwire, even on those fences there are wooden posts every few feet along the way.  This would be a great way to add some seasonal color.

A few inexpensive galvanized buckets, a couple of holes drilled for hanging from a nail or hook, some soil, and boom...instant color and interest.  Maybe even add some sort of way to hold in moisture between waterings (though our wet Spring weather should take care of that).  Maybe they wouldn't be used in the heat of our Summer but either way, they are lovely.

Be inspired!

16 comments:

Gemmagirl said...

Our neighbour just put up a new fence. Great idea for our side. You always inspire.

donna baker said...

I once planted marigolds in an old pair of cowgirl boots and hung them on the gate. They held moisture well.

Colleen said...

beautiful way to decorate a fence line but not a good idea on a fence when there is livestock on the other side.
Don't throw away your old, worn out shoes as I have used old, worn out shoes ('lost soles' sign close by) and used as planters before.
https://www.google.com/search?q=old+shoes+used+as+planters&biw=1536&bih=802&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj0oN-j8fTRAhVWz2MKHZrrAgsQsAQIGQ
My thoughts; if it holds dirt and has good drainage; It's a planter. :}

Pammy Sue said...

That really IS inspiring! So pretty!

creations.1 said...

They are lovely - would only be an autumn, winter, spring thing here - our 40+ temps would wreck them in no time. Succulents would probably survive tho! Enjoy them if you do make them!

Texas Rose said...

Really colorful idea!

Practical Parsimony said...

Lovely idea! Here is an idea. There was a guy living near me who suddenly had a yard full of flowers. It was beautiful. Another day, I thought how beautiful it still looked. Later, I realized none of the flowers faded. He had stuck silk flowers in the ground and had "roses" growing up his porch. Yes, tacky, but they won't die in the heat...okay, don't do this...lol.

1st Man said...

Aww, thanks for that. Yes, wouldn't that be great for your side? I'm already looking for some buckets for this idea. One of those we can implement quickly and easily, ha.

1st Man said...

I bet that was adorable. And you know, thanks for the reminder of marigolds, those things are practically indescribable and might be the perfect colorful flower for this.

1st Man said...

OOH. Good point. Thanks for that remind. And thanks for the link. Wise words about holding dirt and draining. ;-)

1st Man said...

Aw, thanks for that!!! Thanks for commenting!

1st Man said...

Thank you for taking the time to comment. And thanks for the words of encouragement, we'll see what happens!

1st Man said...

Isn't it? Thanks!!!

1st Man said...

Now THAT is too funny! You know, mixed in with real flowers, you could do some artificial flowers and I bet know one would know! ;-)

geoffrey said...

try portulaca or purslane in summer. both are outstandingly drought tolerant and will definitely make it all week with only weekend watering. flowering might not be so abundant as when kept slightly damp, but I think the results will be pleasing enough anyway.
you might also try adding 'water crystals' to your potting mix as they can really extend time between waterings. specialty soils are available that already include it. I saw one called 'soil moist' at an orange big box store out here in California which is probably on the shelf in your area.

on the other hand, a mix of variegated sedums and other succulents in a very well-drained mix (with drainage holes in the containers) would provide some color and a lot of interest throughout all the seasons and would likely only need replacement every few years when some got too straggly.

good luck and thanks for the sweet little site to visit.

same former TCN as in prior comment today.

1st Man said...

HELLO Geoffrey! Thank you SO much for this. We love when a professional comments and gives us great advice. I like the idea of drought tolerant and surviving during the week. I never thought about the portulaca. And succulents and sedums are a great suggestion. Thank you again and comment anytime. I'm always asking questions about something, we are just sort of trial and error as we get things developing out there.

I'd really like to work on the landscaping and do something natural/xeriscaping that works for our soil/weather conditions.