Monday, March 26, 2018

RED METAL FIRST AID KIT DIY

So.....here is a fun (and ongoing) project.  What is it?  Read on!

Red Excel metal tool box
We started with this metal tool box.  Heavy, sturdy, seals up nicely and definitely mouse proof.

Purchased here at Amazon (affiliate):

$16.72.  Not too bad for heavy duty quality.


It's a nice size and has this removable top tray that adds more storage.  


It holds a lot of tools in the bottom. But wait?
Are we going to put tools in it?
No, we have other plans.


I ordered some stickers online.  Three "white cross" stickers and 2 "first aid kit" stickers.  They threw in a 9/11 sticker which we thought was kind of a nice touch to add to our new first aid kit.  

Red metal First Aid kit
I put one of these on the front and another on the lower part of the back side.


Then I put a white cross on each end of the box.

And just like that, voila!
A heavy duty first aid kit for the farm!


We've started buying some things to put in it.  The lower portion will hold quite a bit.  So far we've got rubbing alcohol, and some wraps and bandages in different sizes and shapes.

Still room for more of course.  


The lift out tray now has some band-aids, antibacterial ointment, hydrocortisone cream, and some aspirin, ibuprofen, and acetaminophen.  

Still room for more here too.  

We are thinking of buying a second one to have one for minor incidents and one for major things that might come up.  This is all for us to have at the farm for routine day to day possibilities and/or post hurricane or other disaster where we might need some longer term supplies.

So with space left in this one and possibly a second one, what items are must haves when prepping a good first aid kit?

Feel free to make suggestions below!

33 comments:

  1. I repurposed my husbands old metal tool box just like this only it's gray that we keep in the bed of our pick-up. Always nice to carry along one of them insulated blankets as well in your car or truck.

    Essential First Aid Items:
    https://www.surefirecpr.com/essential-first-aid-items-car/

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    1. this is the emergency blanket I'm talking about to keep handy in your car, truck, boat, etc. https://www.walmart.com/c/kp/emergency-blankets

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    2. Thanks for the link. Great ideas.

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  2. Good idea. Especially since you’re out in the country with medical care at a distance. And if you’re there during a storm, it will definitely be a necessity. The red metal toolbox will be really sturdy.
    Like Colleen, I keep one in my car but looking at the website she provided, I’ll need to add some things.

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    1. That's it, we're about 20 miles from the nearest hospital and that's through traffic too. We saw some canvas first aid kits, lots of cools pouches and pockets and come with stuff but didn't seem very mouse proof. Plastic ones were small. This just seemed like a good idea, ha. Great ideas here, I hope people keep contributing.

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  3. Very cute and efficient way to have a first aid kit.
    Add tweezers, liquid benadryl, cotton balls and q-tips to apply the alcohol and ointments.
    Cheers,
    Scotia

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    1. Oh, great ideas, thank you! And yes, style has to count for something too, right? Ha!

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  4. I second the liquid benadryl, or some sort of antihistamine, in case someone develops an allergy to bee stings. Maybe some balsa wood tongue depressors in case you need to immobilize a finger or two?

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    1. Liquid Benadryl, thank you also for that idea. There are things that sting out there for sure. Bees, wasps, scorpions, etc. Tongue depressors as splints, great idea too.

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  5. What a fabulous idea and so practical to have something sturdy and easy to find.
    I would recommend a small bottle of Tea Tree Oil, it is the best antiseptic I have ever used (years on a farm) and is powerful and concentrated.
    Arnica ointment for sprains, bruising etc. Some cream for 'drawing out' splinters.A can of spray on 'skin', something for wasp stings,a little eye cup for irrigating the eyes. Grow some Aloe Vera for burns and sunburn.
    A couple of syringes minus needles are always handy, for irrigating dirt from wounds.A good sharp pair of scissors will be useful too.
    A good idea is to test your phone reception all over the property in case of emergency away from the house and carry a satellite phone if needed.I think it is a good precaution to have a workmans brace for heavy chores, they wrap around your waist , are secured by 'Velcro' and support your back, many sportsmen wear something similar.
    An easy to use sunblock is a must in the house and barn and always check the use by date as they do stop working .A little sticker on the outside of your red box with the soonest use by date for any creams etc will help keep track of things being out of date by the time you need them.
    Fingers crossed you don't have to use any of this, think of it all as an insurance policy. ..better to kit it out and never use most of it.

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    1. Hello! Wow, you have some wonderful suggestions that aren't on most lists. And it's from experience, ha. I know of Tee Tree oil but didn't know it could be used as n antiseptic. Arnica? I'll be look gin for that too. We DO have an eye cup, will definitely put that in there too. Thanks again for sharing your knowledge with all of us.

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  6. If you are kitting up for major problems, a neck brace and some splints could be handy, Asprin for heart attacks, electrolytes powder or liquid for dehydration and something for vomiting or diarrhea.
    A poster of CPR in the barm and a laminated copy in the box will help in panic situations or if you have to have help from someone untrained.

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    1. More great suggestions and you know, a first aid poster and card in the box is a wonderful suggestion. Thanks!!

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  7. Eye wash cup & solution in case something flies into your peepers (I have glass cups but Bausch & Lomb sells disposables that are probably more sanitary like this one (please replace with your link to this item on Amazon)

    https://www.walgreens.com/store/c/advanced-eye-relief-eye-wash/ID=prod1585-product

    Tourniquet (Very important in case 1st Man flips over the lawn mower & runs over his leg)

    Butterfly wound closures til the ambulance gets there

    Hydrogen peroxide to clean wounds, sterilize

    Tweezers to get thorns & stickers out as others said

    Definitely Benadryl in case you get stung by bee or worse, as others have reminded you

    Also, one of those cooling menthol/aloe sprays like Solarcain, not only for sunburn but in case you get bit by Texas Fire Ants (run for your lives!)

    Ice packs in the freezer at all times of course.

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    1. Yet again more great ideas. Thank you! And I have been bitten many times by fire ants those suckers hurt. Solarcain works? I will definitely buy some of that. Thanks for the contributions, all great!!!

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  8. Chemical hot packs & cold packs. The cold packs especially since they help with swelling & you won't have a bag of frozen peas with you!!! Half dozen foil emergency blankets & giant leaf garbage bags for emergency warming. The foil blankets cost a buck a piece in the Dollar Store & can be given out at car accidents too. And a box of old fashioned maternity pads if you can find them!!! They are extra long & extra thick with long ends - excellent as a field dressings because they can be tied to a limb or head.
    Think of BLEEDING, SWELLING, CHOKING, BREATHING, FREEZING & OVERHEATING. Most of your emergencies will be the first three, if you can deal with them, you will be fine.

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    1. Oh yes!! good ideas. And you have a great suggestion with he maternity pads. Bleeding, while God forbid we hope we never need it, it's good to think of something to help with that. Thank you again so much!

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  9. Just make sure you calendar the expiration dates on any of the items- especially ointments etc.

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    1. That's a good one too. I think maybe printed asmall calendar and tucking it inside with the items written on the month/yr they expire. Thanks!!

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  10. charcoal pills, they are miracle workers for upset stomachs, poisoning, etc.

    MaryBeth

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    1. Oh yes!! We have some charcoal capsules here in town and they are miracle things. Good idea for a bottle out there too

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  11. I would definitely recommend a second one and make it for more serious things. I would put a snake bite pack in there!

    Janie V

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    1. Snake bite kit! Need thought about it but yes, definitely need that. And pray we NEVER have to use it. We're thinking a second box is definitely on the horizon. I like the idea of one for basic and one for urgent things (or perhaps more uncommon things).

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  12. What I was going to add have been suggested!

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    1. Hey, we'll all learn something and that's a good thing.

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  13. You have had so many excellent suggestions that the only thing I can think of (unfortunate incident with barbed wire) is some wire cutters and needle nose pliers

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    1. Good point and there IS barbed wire all around the property. Thank you!

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  14. Tweezers, scissors, eyeglass repair kit (has a small magnifier and tiny tweezers that I've used to pull splinters). Maybe add a small vet first aid when you bring your kitty down. Good planning!

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    1. Great ideas! And I like the reminder about vet kit first air. Thanks!

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  15. When living on a Homestead, there are two tools commonly used and those are the most dangerous tools that cause the most serious of wounds. The Chainsaw and the Axe! They can cause brutal injuries and possibly life threatening because you tend to live far from Emergency Care. You need to be able to easily stop gushing blood loss and then transport to an ER. For this task I own: The Israeli Bandage (also known as Quick-Clot) for this job. It was developed by the Israeli Military and I trust their testing and development.

    Link to the description and a video on how to use:
    https://livingprepared.blogspot.com/2015/01/emergency-bandage-aka-israeli-bandage.html

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    1. Wow, I learned something new! Those are two things we own (amongst others that could probably harm me too) and you are right, a wound with an axe or chainsaw would be life threatening, even in a 20 minute drive. I am going to look at adding these. Thank you!!!

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  16. Tampons. Don't laugh, I said tampons. They absorb a lot of blood and you can tie them on with gauze. Every barn I ever worked in (a lot) had tampons on hand. Sanitary napkins are also good - both products absorb much more blood than a gauze pad will do.

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    1. Hey, we won't laugh. That's a great idea too. I've heard that in the past and totally forgot about it. Thank you!!!

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