Wednesday, September 26, 2012

THE STUNNING WHITE FLOWERS OF FROSTWEED

Frostweed on each side of the trail

When I've mowed recently, this is the sight that greets me on a certain part of the property.  No worries, I didn't mow over them, this is one of the paths, I've been continually mowing and it seems to have created a border of these flowers.  According to my Wildflowers book, it is called "Frostweed".  Its other names are Virginia Crownbeard, Ice plant, Tickseed, Tickweed, Squaw-weed, and Indian Tobacco.  Believe it or not, it is actually a member of the Sunflower family.

Frostweed in bloom
It is a perennial that grows between three and seven feet tall.  As you can see above, there are a variety of sizes in one grouping.  It blooms from August until November, so I'll have them to look forward to until the mowing season is finally over for the year.

Field of Frostweed
Here is what they look like when viewed as a whole.  Isn't it great?  It's so pretty to see so much white in the Summer because it actually reminds me of Spring. The flowers have an interesting scent too; the closest thing I can use to describe it is that they smell like a sweet soap.  I know that sounds odd but it is actually a very pleasing smell.

Interesting side note: Native American Indians dried the leaves of this and used it as a substitute for tobacco in smoking!  I don't smoke so I won't be attempting that and besides, I'm not sure what laws might be involved, LOL.

16 comments:

  1. the frostweed is beautiful! i love it when bloggers from different parts of the world share their flora/fauna/land - it gives you a chance to see some very beautiful things that you would have never seen before. i would love to run down the path that you made with those beautiful flowers on each side. i imagine they smell delicious!

    your friend,
    kymber

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is kind of cool huh? I'm always enjoying seeing your part of the world as well. Isn't this planet just amazing in its diversity? I think it's so cool there are plants in one place that no one has in other places.

      They do smell great, even while I'm riding down the paths on the mower I can smell them when the breeze blows. You know what? This weekend I'll run down the paths just for you! :-)

      Delete
  2. I can't see it well enough to tell, but it might be the tickweed that "sticks" to EVERYTHING, dogs cats people, clothing and is HELL to get off. I plowed and mowed all of mine down several years ago and threw out corn gluten to inhibit those little seeds from coming back. thank heavens because it can become a real problem. Beautiful yes but in it's heart there lurks a DEVIL full of evil intent!!!LOL

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmm, I'm not sure about that. I did brush up against it a few times while trying to get pictures and I don't remember stuff sticking to me but I should check that out. Thanks for the warning. I would hate to mow them down, it's so pretty, ha.

      Interesting about corn gluten? I didn't know that would inhibit the seeds? Does that work for all weeds? Could I put that in flower beds?

      Thanks for the tip!!!

      Delete
  3. What a beautiful sight! And I love seeing the bit of your big green machine - it makes me feel like I'm right there at Seda Bolsa Farm!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Aw, thanks for that. I'm afraid my time (season) for the big machine is running out so I'll miss it until next Spring.

      Thank you for the nice words!! :-)

      Delete
  4. Its really beautiful and frost weed is a great name for it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Isn't that a great name? When I looked it up and found it and saw the name I thought that was so cool. Funny how you can "dress" the word "weed" and make it sound exotic, ha. Best of all, next year I'll be able to go "oh, the frostweed is blooming" and I'll sound like I know what I'm talking about, ha.

      Delete
  5. I wasn't gonna comment but...I would be a tad bit worried about whats under all those plants a.k.a. rattlesnakes and such.That would scare me walking thru there guy.Ya know I'm in Texas too and heck we got one that hangs out here at the end of our trailer lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I ALWAYS enjoy your comments, never worry about that. Hmm, I DID think about that, of course I was on the mower mostly. I'd stay on the paths mostly, I don't think I'd venture out through there TOO much. And at night? Um, that would be a definite no, ha. I will keep my eyes open. Thank you for the heads up. And if I see anything, you'll read about it here first ha,

      Delete
  6. The seeds stick only after they have dried. Animals get so covered with them that they must be shorn. Yes corn gluten is the only thing I use for stopping seeds from germinating. It works great for any kind of seed, even in flowerbeds but you will then have to do only transplants not seed to plant another flower. Works great in the yard for little goat burrs that jab you when they get a chance. Little buggers can be wiped out in two seasons with the use of corn gluten. for that reason alone I love to use it!! PS, I always use anonymous because I don't know how to use any of the other things listed. I am Dianne the person who can't get anything to work on blogspot.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hmm, that's fascinating! Seriously I've never heard that about corn gluten and I like that's it's an all natural solution. I'd be ok with no seeds in the flower beds, I plan on using transpants to get things started next Spring.

      I'm going to do some more research for that. Thank you again.

      I totally understand about not being able to get things to work in blogspot, It does have those moments. It's ok, I like all comments, ha. Thank you Dianne!

      Delete
  7. If it ever freezes you'll see why it's called frostweed. The stems split and curls of frozen sap emerge-it's very pretty.

    And the years the goats don't eat all of mine, the monarchs and other butterflies really love the flowers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I heard something about that, the freezing part. I really though it was because of the white flowers and how it looks like a blanket of frost. Learn something new every day, ha. Now I hope it freezes to be able to see it, ha.

      And yes, I should have mentioned that in my post, butterflies all over the place.

      Delete
  8. You know you might can cut some of those and spray either shelac or hair spray on them.Just a thought here.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oooh, good idea, thank you! I need to try that out. It might be really pretty in some vases I got for the dining room table. They are so light and airy I'd love to save them somehow. At least for a few months.

      Delete

Please leave us a comment! I have some comment moderation on and of course will approve your comment relatively quickly. We love feedback and hearing what others have to share with us all. Please know that I can't always reply to it right away, but ALL comments are read. I will reply just as soon as I can so be sure to come back and see my reply.

Now, let us hear from you!