Thursday, March 23, 2017

AZALEAS IN THE WOODS, INSPIRATION THURSDAY

Every Thursday we like to post a picture of something we've found online that inspires us to do something similar at the farm.  
Sort of our own blog bulletin board so that we can eventually look back and someday, hopefully anyway, recreate it...enjoy!


Last week on Inspiration Thursday, we posted a pretty color palette of purple and yellow.  Several of you identified them as azaleas which of course we should have noticed (they have azaleas all over Houston this time of year).  So we were "Googling" pictures of azaleas and found this.  

This is such an amazing blaze of color, in the woods no less.  Azaleas like a bit of shade, from what we've read, morning dappled sun and afternoon shade is good.  We have JUST the spot for something like this (I'm in the process of getting it cleared now).  Would be so pretty to see when they are in bloom.  We love the random nature of their placement here.  Anyone grown azaleas?  

Be inspired!

20 comments:

  1. Little bit of heaven right here on earth.
    That is Gorgeous and having a bench sitting around here and there would be awesome or even a fountain but then that would require electricity but yet would be lovely having the sound of water in such a beautiful setting.

    Ok, I'm awake now and can quit dreaming

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    1. Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs
      Level of toxicity: Generally mild to severe, depending on the amount ingested
      Common signs to watch for:
      Drooling
      Vomiting
      Diarrhea
      Inappetance
      Abdominal pain
      Abnormal heart rate and rhythms
      Hypotension
      Weakness
      Tremors
      Depression
      Blindness
      Seizures
      Coma
      The Azalea is actually a species of Rhododendron. Over 1000 species of rhododendrons/azaleas exist. The small, deciduous species are referred to as the Azalea and the large, woody shrubs as Rhododendrons. The Rhododendron is more toxic but this can vary drastically due to the hybridization of these two common plants. These plants contain grayanotoxins which disrupt sodium channels affecting the skeletal and cardiac muscle. All parts of the plant are considered poisonous, and as little as ingestion of 0.2% of an animal’s body weight can result in poisoning. When ingested, clinical signs include gastrointestinal signs (e.g., drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, inappetance), cardiovascular (e.g., abnormal heart rate, heart arrhythmias, weakness, hypotension), and central nervous system signs (e.g., depression, tremors, transient blindness, seizures, coma, etc.). The overall prognosis is fair with treatment.

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    2. Well you know how to bring us up and then back down, ha. No, just teasing. Yep, I know they are toxic. 2nd Family has had a few around their house for years and have't had a problem but it's definitely something to think about. They sure are pretty!

      Every Spring here in Houston is an event called the "Azalea Trail" and it's large (very large) homes in River Oaks neighborhood who have STUNNING displays of color like this. Literally thousands of azaleas. It's SO pretty to see.

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  2. Just Glorious, and a place to sit and appreciate the colours is a good idea....you could just get a solar fountain if you wanted the sound of sprinkling water to add to the bliss .

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    1. Solar fountain is a great idea. Thanks!! Wouldn't it be pretty to just sit there in the shade with a cold drink and just soak it all in??

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  3. We have quite a few miniatures. The bush doesn't grow very big and the flowers on some of them are tiny. They are very easy accommodating plants. All mine get filtered light, some more than others. I think a glorious splash of colour sprinkled through the bush and around Barnabas would be amazing.

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    1. Thanks, I didn't know they had miniatures. Will have to look on that. Filtered light is definitely what we would have around the spot I'm clearing (not Barnabas, though he would be a good choice too). Thanks!!!!

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  4. Ooooh.
    I have a brown thumb where azaleas are concerned, but love seeing other people's success.
    And yes, they don't like full sun (or most varieties don't). Deciduous azalea trees would look lovely in that wood too.

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    1. I have a brown thumb with some things too. We'll see on this ha. Will look up deciduous trees too. Thanks!!!

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  5. So, just don't eat them. Cats and dogs usually don't eat plants except grass. Their beauty is spectacular; thank you for the post. We can't grow them in our climate now.

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    1. They are spectacular for sure. And they DO grow in our climate. We have to use what does grow, ha.

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  6. This is just beautiful! They would be so pretty under some of your trees.

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    1. Thank you, we'll see how it call comes out. I'm working on clearing our little wooded area, a bit each weekend (making progress). I'll keep you posted.

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  7. My yard looked similar to this.It was that way when we moved here.It was lovely,but alas one by one the bushes succumbed. There is only one very large and beautiful rhododendron left. I have had many dogs and cats over the years and none ever ate them. -Miss Georgia.

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    1. Oh, dang, that's too bad, sorry about that. Rhododendrons would be great in the spot we're working too. I forgot about those. Thanks!!!

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  8. I love azalea and have several. In 1980, I planted twenty around the front bay of my house. Then, in 1990, I received three in a large pot for a Mother's Day gift in a secret sister exchange at church. I never force-fed my dog or cat. None of the other cats in my yard pay any attention to the azaleas! The hens never seemed interested.

    The only time we need to worry about the toxicity of a plant is if animals like to eat it for whatever reason. You're safe to plant these.

    The pink in the front looks like Coral Bell, my favorite.

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    1. Thanks, glad to know. And I bet yours are so pretty and they've been there a long time! You are doing something right!

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    2. 1st man,
      They do occasionally die, but it took 20 years before I lost one. If the Doberman had not lifted his leg against one small plant, it would have survived. I did replace it after he went away.

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  9. Yes, I should have said this in my first post. My bushes were very old. Mature when I moved here and I've been here over twenty years. I don't want to make it seem as if they are not hardy.-Miss Georgia

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    1. Aww, thanks for that update. Glad to know they are hardy. That's what we are hoping.

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