Tuesday, August 6, 2013

HELP IDENTIFY THESE TREES


Our property is made up of mostly mesquite trees with a few oddball random trees thrown in, like these.


I'm a newbie when it comes to "oh that's a such and such tree".  Sure I can identify some of the obvious (Mesquite especially, LOL) but there are these two that I'm not sure what they are.  I'd like to know so that I can properly care for them, prune them correctly, fertilize them, etc.


Here is a closeup picture:
Standard size trunk, rough bark, with small, oval green leaves.

The Two Sisters
There are two, so naturally I created a winding path between them with the mower.  I've taken to calling them "The Two Sisters".  On all of the property, there aren't any other trees like these two.

Since they aren't really native to the property, as in there aren't others like them all over the place, and they are both the same height, it makes me wonder if maybe they were planted, once upon a time, on purpose?

19 comments:

wendywoo said...

I don't know what state you are in, here in NY I don't know of any mesquite trees... I wonder if the mystery tree is an Osage Orange. I have seen one or two in my time, they are not native to NY so are few and far between. I have a small one and the bark on the branches is gray and the leaves are similar..

Lorilee said...

They look like they could be youpon trees. Males would have red berries in the fall.
Good luck identifying them!
Lorilee

Linda said...

Possibly an Ash tree? Do you know if it flowers or gets seed pods? Check out this website http://www.arborday.org/trees/whattree/WhatTree.cfm?ItemID=E6A It might help.

donna baker said...

Osage Orange is also known as Bois d'Arc and they have thorns on them. Hardest wood you can find and were also used as fence posts by farmers and ranchers before the metal fence posts became the norm. They don't rot and you can still see stands of them along fences in the country. They usually have several trunks coming out of the ground on each tree, but not always. They have those large lime green, convoluted 'apples' in the fall, which they drop everywhere, but only when they reach a certain age.

jaz@octoberfarm said...

i'm not sure what they are but they look a lot like a good start to that entry photo you posted recently.

Monsoon Matriarch said...

a close up of the leaves and end branches would be helpful. I'm in AZ and will confirm that they are not even close to mesquite. If not osage orange (you should see last year's dried on the ground or this years growing on the tree) or ash (I'm only familiar w/Arizona ash and the shape is wrong for that variety), I'd explore the members of the elm family that grow in your area.

Did they bloom, put out catkins or put on fruit? If so, can you describe? Thanks

Monsoon Matriarch said...

Here is a great website:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/ornamentals/natives/indexcommon.htm

If it has an odd smell when you crush the leaves, and puts on clusters of small white blossoms in spring, it may be an elder.

rheather said...

I'm thinking cedar elm, especially if the leaves have serrated edges.
http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=ULCR
The Wildflower center had better leaf pictures than the Aggies...

Heather

LindaG said...

Check with your local Ag center. Take several pictures. They can probably identify for you, or may come out to identify.
Good luck!

1st Man said...

We are in Texas (I will put that in the blog by the way, realized there is nothing identifying that, ha, thanks).An Osage Orange? Hmm, great thought, I'll look at pics and then look up close this weekend. Check back next week!

1st Man said...

You know, I thought that too, a friend had one in their yard but I haven't seen any berries at any time, Spring or Fall, so I'm not sure. I'll do some research and be sure and let everyone know! Thank you!

1st Man said...

I need to snatch some leaves (or a small branch) this weekend. I have never seen flowers or seed pods. That website is great, thank you for the link.

1st Man said...

Definitely no thorns on these. And have never seen any fruit (good or bad, ha) or flowers or seed pods. I'll check it out more closely this weekend. Side note, I'd love to have some of those trees for the hard wood.

1st Man said...

LOL....that would be huh? We might someday bring the driveway through there, or at least part of it. Don't tempt me, haha.

1st Man said...

Gotta love those Aggies, they do know their plants, ha. I will check it out, thank you. I haven't crushed any leaves or taken any up close pics, but this weekend, I'll get some better pics and samples so we can all solve the mystery. :-) Thank you for the info~

1st Man said...

Cedar Elm huh? Another to add to the list. And what? Wildflower Center better than the Aggies? Must be a UT conspiracy, LOL! Thanks for this link too, adding it to my bookmarks bar.

1st Man said...

Thank you for the tip, will definitely check it out. I will let you know what we discover!!

Midnite Baker said...

I'll agree with Heather. They look like an elm. And check with your local state extension office. They can help for sure. And take some leaves and your pictures. Let us know what the decision is. M

Joani said...

Just take a branch to your local nursery, they should be able to help you identify.