Monday, December 28, 2015

GROWING CHRISTMAS TREES

I had this post ready for last week but because of the move and subsequent chaos, I'm posting it today.  Our Internet connection at the new apartment has been spotty, so I had to go with a post that was ready so I could get something different up instead of more moving woes, LOL.  I hope to get caught up with comments later tonight.

So without further ado, here is the delayed post:

Christmas Pine
So of course, over the last few weeks whenever I was at grocery stores there were always a couple dozen beautiful Christmas trees lined up for sale.  I stood there looking at them and snapped some pictures for this post.  

 Seeing them all lined up in rows like that made me wonder if we could actually plant, on purpose, some Christmas trees at the farm for our own future use?  Maybe a couple every season so that they are staggered in their development?

Christmas Trees
We actually like this kind of tree, not sure what variety it is, but of course, we'd also have to find one that does well in our climate.  There are a couple of Christmas Tree farms around us, the "cut your own" kind of places, and they obviously have trees that grow well.  Perhaps we could go visiting and see what they are growing.

We just think it would be so cool to plant some saplings and then in a few years, when we are at the farm full time, we'll have our own trees to cut year after year.  

Anyone ever grown their own Christmas tree?


15 comments:

laurie said...

my father sold off 20 acres of the family farm and the fella made it into a Christmas Tree farm, it was wonderful,, beautiful!
I think you have a great plan!

Anonymous said...

I am in my 79th year so I have many happy Christmas memories but the ones that stand out to me are the ones where I went with my father to cut out Christmas tree on my aunt's farm. We were "town" people and they were "country" people. As a picky little girl, I got to choose the tree. It was always perfect or course- just the right size and just the right shape. As my father, not an outdoorsman, grew older we began buying our tree. They may have been prettier but they were not the same. Grow your own and grow memories. God Bless. Julia

Gail said...

We have always cut our own. A cedar that is common and pops us as wild life spread the seeds. Checking a local farm would be a good idea.

Delores said...

Sounds like a great idea to grow our own Christmas trees. Hoping you are nowhere near the tornado that swept through.

Ellen in Oregon said...

In Oregon it seems that many small land owners grow Christmas trees. Ny Sister has a small farm on 40 acres. They grew Christmas trees because it gave them some kind of status to be designated as farmland and the State gave them a tax deduction because they grew a x number of trees & sold them. You might check with your county extension service or State IRS to see what the tax incentives might be in Texas. The trees in your photos look a lot like the Douglas firs grown here in Oregon, but can't be positive.

donna baker said...

We had a Christmas tree farm for about 15 years and let me know if you are interested in growing them.

Anne in the kitchen said...

I had not thought of that for the lake, but I could easily have some future Christmas/barrier trees. Thanks for sharing your very brilliant idea

Elephant's Child said...

I prefer my trees alive. For a number of years we had a tree in a pot which we would bring in and decorate. When it grew too big to bring inside we gave it to friend for his property - where it is now over 20 feet tall.

Leigh said...

I think that would be a great idea, although it would take a few years to get it going. They "used" ones would make good goat feed. I kind of like getting potted trees, though, and planting them afterward. We can always use another privacy hedge!

Marcia said...

Just catching up on blogs. Company that was here for 5 nights is now on their way to the other grandparents. We'll see them for one overnight on their return north to NH.

Sounds like you had a very busy Christmas. We did too but not for the same reason.

Happy New Year and yes growing your own Christmas trees sounds marvelous.

FionaG said...

Yes, I'm for the potted variety and then planting them when they are too big. You could buy different varieties so that when you walk around your property you could recognise the tree from Christmas 2015, etc. Over time you would end up with a lovely woodland type area. Hope the move madness has settled. Have a wonderful and safe New Year.

Texan said...

That would be so fun. I tried blue spruce here, it died. To hot. I think visiting the Christmas Tree farms in your area and finding out the variety they are growing would be such a great idea!

Texas Rose said...

Sounds like a fun thing to do! That's great that there are some nearby tree farms to point you in the right direction about the best varieties to plant.
One year, instead of a regular Christmas tree, I had a wild yaupon tree - with its red berries, it was already half decorated - one of the prettiest Christmas "trees" I've had!

Practical Parsimony said...

That does look like a Douglas fir, first choice. Great idea!

Practical Parsimony said...

my first choice