Friday, May 25, 2018

VINTAGE OIL LAMPS

Here's something neat and with good memories.

I got these two lamps after my Grandfather died and my Mom and her family were cleaning out the house.  These were in the cellar (Oklahoma, where every other house has a cellar) and I asked if I could have them.  No one else wanted old, used, oil lamps so they became mine.  To be honest, I put them in a box and stored them in the garage at the house (this was 2001) and forgot about them.  There they sat until we sold the house and were cleaning out things.  

I put them in storage again only this time at the farm and recently got them out yet again while I was straightening up the barn. This time we brought them back into town and will get them all cleaned up. 


They need new metal parts (I'm going to have to learn the names of all these parts, ha). 


They also need new wicks, but maybe that comes with the whole upper part.  We believe Lehman's has these types of supplies in stock, hope they have the correct size (any other website suggestions?).

Vintage oil lamps
It'll be easy to replace the parts because they just screw in. We'll just need to measure the openings since the ring portion that the whole top part screws into is permanently mounted inside the glass base.  

They aren't valuable.  To some they would just be a matching set of old school oil lamps, but for me, the fact that they lit the way during dark and stormy times, well, that makes them priceless.

Besides, a homestead can always use an alternative source of light during a disaster or power failure, right?


28 comments:

  1. What lovely lamps. Super Cool.

    Just a few links in finding parts for old oil lamps

    https://www.antiquelampsupply.com/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIt9KuxIah2wIVC5-fCh0ZngJfEAAYASAAEgL7K_D_BwE

    https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=oil+lamp+replacement+parts&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=228988947035&hvpos=1t2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=9803700127837492696&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9027193&hvtargid=kwd-301172296041&ref=pd_sl_1g5m4pjvhh_b_p37

    https://www.antiquelampsupply.com/all-oil-lamp-parts

    https://www.ebay.com/bhp/oil-lamp-parts

    http://www.oillampantiques.com/category/our-current-range/replacement-parts/

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  2. What warm memories these old lamps hold. I love how you said they "lit the way during dark and stormy times" in your grandpa's house.
    They are so pretty with the etched designs. After you get them cleaned up and repaired, they will look beautiful in your apartment and later at the Farm. And with our crazy weather nowadays, they will be a useful backup source of light.

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    1. I'm not sure we'll use them at the apartment, we're lucky to have backup generators here, but we'll get em cleaned up and working and who knows. Might be cool to have some here in town too, ha.

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  3. I certainly hope you are not planning to replace the top part that screws into the lamp base! Just gently clean the tops. The rust and discoloration only show they were used by your grandfather. Learn how to trim the wick and why. You can use coal oil in them, but find out which oil smokes the least and use it. My grandmother had a little store and had a coal oil pump out front and sold it to people for their oil lamps. People would bring a pint jar to have it filled. remember people coming to buy it. Practical Parsimony

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    1. I wasn't sure if I could just clean them and get them working but if I can keep them yes, definitely want them. That's such a great idea. thank you. And what a nice memory you have. I wonder if you can get coal oil easily? I bet here in Houston someone has it.

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  4. We use Clear Pure Paraffin Lamp Oil in our emergency lamps. Doesn't smoke a lot and doesn't smell like kerosene.

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    1. Oh, cool, thanks for this info as well.

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  5. Wal~Mart has oil and wicks.. Lamps too!

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    1. They have everything don't they? Ha. Thanks much!!

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  6. I think those oil lamps are beautiful. We are planning on getting some of our own, not just for ambiance but also for practical reasons. What a nice memory you have. :)

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    1. With these you do get an ambiance that you don't with electric. Hope to get them fixed up soon. Thanks!!

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  7. I love oil lamps, but my ex-husband always said that they're dangerous. I don't know why.

    Love,
    Janie

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    1. They are dangerous I suppose if you knocked one over, and of course they are hot to the touch but I suppose we just have to be careful, ha.

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  8. I would think they only would be dangerous if one got tipped over while it was lit. We grew up with oil lamps on the farm in rural Maine and even though we had power, it went out a lot and then we used the old lamps. In fact I still have a couple on them up in my cupboard...got to get them out, clean them up and use them!

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    1. I had a friend whose family lived in rural Massachusetts and they said that power was always going out too. We're going to see how these go and might get some more. I'm almost sure we have some more oil lamps in storage from my parents.

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  9. I understand your attachment to the old lamps. My grandparents lived on a farm in the Ozarks of Missouri and they never had electricity or running water. We city kids loved the kerosene lamps. My husband's dad collected lamps and got my husband interested in them, but he only collects the Alladin lamps. They have a circular wick and a mantle that hangs over the wick. The mantle glows brightly and makes a white light like a light bulb. They're much more efficient than the regular kerosene lamps. The light is so bright that you can't look directly at it for long. If you really want to have light without electricity, you might keep an eye out for some Alladin lamps. You can even buy new ones. But, of course, some of the old ones are works of art. You can put a glass shade over the lamp, too. If you've never seen one, you need to do some research. They're impressive. Amazon even sells new ones, but antique stores, second-hand stores and old hardware stores often have them at good prices.

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    1. OMG! We do have some Aladdin lamps! Vintage antique ones! My parents had two. I remember the wicks, or mantles, being very fragile (they were almost like glass). Every time we moved my dad babied the mantles but occasionally one broke and they'd have to find a new one. They are in the storage unit. I will be getting them out next.

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  10. I have two that I use outside when we grill. I put citronella in them to keep mosquitos away.

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    1. Oh wow, what a great idea!! I never thought about using them outside. I think of just emergencies but that's a great way to use them more often. Thanks for this idea!!

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  11. i was going to suggest lehman's...they have everything!

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    1. Oh my dream (and 2nd Man's) is to someday get to the Lehman's store. I"m afraid we'd have to rent a u-haul to bring everything back that we'd probably buy, ha.

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  12. If Walmart doesn't have your size Amazon does

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    1. Thanks for this, I'll be checking that out. (Amazon has everything ha).

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  13. I've had an oil lamp for years. Used it sometimes when power was out, which rarly happens any more...but one never knows! Hardware store where I work has some parts and oil as well. I remember a few years ago while at the coast, I went in a hardware store that had a huge section of oil lamps and all the parts...amazing! Of course there's many storms over there and could be used alot too. Doitbest.com

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    1. Great idea. I bet they have them around here since we're so close to the coast. I'll do some checking once we get them cleaned up and ready.

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  14. Take the burner with you to determine the size wick. You can buy wick on a spool and never have to buy expensive short wicks again. If the burner works and you can still raise and lower the wick and are determined to buy a new one, keep the old one. Also, take the burner to get the correct size chimney. Ask me how I know. One day, I found a cheap chimney, bought it, took it home and it was the wrong size. If you shop in an antique shop for a oil lamp, remember the burner screws onto the inside of the lamp. If the burner screws on like a jar cap, it is not an antique and do not let anyone tell you differently.

    I go in "ignorant" and ask questions. When I find a new oil lamp that is passed off for antique, then I never believe a word they say about anything. You do not have to examine the lamps closely to determine how the burner screws on. So, you will know what you are buying and if you are overpaying.
    Practical Parsimony

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    1. Thank you so much for this info. You have given us some great info for shopping. I brought the lamps back into town and forgot the burners, oops! I'll have to get them next weekend. We'll see how it goes. I will be coming back to this post to check all the great suggestions like this one.

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