Wednesday, June 10, 2015

A HOLE IN ONE

Glove!

OK...so I put on some rubber/latex gloves because I couldn't find my regular garden gloves.  When I'm potting things or planting in our 'clay' holes in the yard, I like to wear gloves.  If we are having dinner afterwards, it makes for cleaning up much easier (and getting to the food faster, ha).

Glove with a hole
I pulled my gloves off when I was done and, um, yeah, I guess there was a hole or tear in one of the fingers.  I never even felt it or noticed it.  

Well, hey, at least the cleanup was STILL pretty easy, LOL!

Side note...does anyone know why bags of soil, compost, etc always have dire warnings on them about wearing gloves while handling?  Again, that's not why I wear them, I usually only have gloves on when I'm just doing something quick and have other plans right afterward...normally I like the feel of the soil in my hands...it connects me back to nature.  I was just curious as to why they have to warn people not to handle it without gloves?


22 comments:

  1. 1st Man,

    Probably because the bags sit outside on pallets for days on end. Spiders, and other bugs can work their way into the bags. Also the product maybe hot or moist inside the bag? I try to use gloves when working with any soil type product because of skin allergens.

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    1. I haven't had to worry about allergens, yet anyway. But yeah, I thought about that too, with the moist damp it is kind of a breeding ground inside a bag.

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  2. Some bagged soils, especially compost contain cow, pig, and/or horse manure. So it's best to wear good gloves while handling them.
    I usually wear non-latex surgical gloves inside my garden gloves. Double security. I buy mine at the local Rx chain store for $9. Great investment for daily chores around the home and garden.

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    1. Oh, that's a great idea. I have a box of the latex kind of gloves and separate garden gloves but I never thought about combining the two. Thanks!!

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  3. I don't know, but at least you can find your gloves. My hands look like a field hand's this time of year and the dirt under the fingernails just won't hardly wash out.

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    1. LOL! Sometimes I experience that myself. Or I'll be at the garden or the flower bed, know exactly where the gloves are (an acre away in the shed) and I just say "oh, screw it, I don't need gloves". Then I complain about how hard it is to clean my hands afterwards, ha.

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  4. Soilborne diseases and parasites?

    Hookworms, etc...Toxoplasmosis, Anthrax, and so on. For more, you can go to: http://bohemiawga.weebly.com/uploads/3/2/6/7/3267391/lbna24893enn.pdf

    I don't always wear my gloves either, lol.

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    1. YIKES! Thank you for that link...I think, ha.

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  5. We are supposed to wear gloves because ' agroup of organisms, called
    Legionella, is found in these materials and can cause serious illness.
    Legionella longbeachae
    is one species known to cause a type of pneumonia in humans.
    I think it is of particular relevance to people with compromised immunity, but still a good idea. Which I very rarely remember...

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    1. Wow, I always think about soil as so 'clean' but never thought about all that stuff. Thank you!

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  6. It's not just gloves, you're suppose to be careful breathing around the stuff as well. Potting mixes can contain bacteria, and as stated above, soil borne diseases.

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    1. BREATHING it too? Yikes! I had no idea. Gloves and face masks, ha. The relaxing power of gardening, LOL!

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  7. I think it's as others have said - the possible bacteria and other organisms in the soil. I also think it's part CYB on the part of the companies. I too love to feel the warm soil in my hands, so usually no gloves for me.

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    1. Warm fresh soil is SO nice isn't it? But yeah, I guess they are posting warnings to cover themselves.

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  8. I love my hands in the dirt, HOWEVER, the bagged compost and bagged soils are a hot bed for bacteria.

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    1. Thank you for that, it makes sense now that I think about all the comments, the bags are warm, moist, dark...perfect environments for nasties!

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  9. Well with all those warnings, i.e. don't breathe it in, wear gloves, could contain bacteria - better not grow stuff in it - much too dangerous !!

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    1. It makes one wonder doesn't it? ;-)

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  10. Maybe because you may have an open cut or sore and there is likely bacteriaa in the mix or even sharp bits that could get under your skin.

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    1. now that I am usually very careful about. I had shorts on the other day, scratch my thigh on some mesquite branches, I cleaned it and put long jeans on because i knew I'd be kneeling down in the soil. Same if I have a cut on my hand. Great advice, thank you!!

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  11. In Westchester County, NY, I liked to pot things with my bare hands. Not any more .I reached in with both hands and pulled out a snake from a bag of Canadian mulch. It was as surprised as I was. Materials are probably packaged mechanically. You never know what gets scooped up into the bag.

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    1. WHAAT?? A snake? Holy crap I would have passed out right there. Thanks for the warning...I think, LOL.

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