Friday, March 15, 2013

FASCINATING GLIMPSE OF HISTORY, IN COLOR

I stumbled across these photos that were posted online the other day and thought I'd share.


The Denver Post published some amazing pictures of life in United States during the Great Depression and into the early part of WWII.  Sure we've all seen photos of this time period many times in our lives, in history books and on documentaries, but for the most part, we've never seen them quite like this.

For example, this homestead below:

Garden adjacent to the dugout home of Jane Whinery, homesteader.  Pie Town, New Mexico, September 1940.  Reproduction from color slide.  Photo by Russell Lee.  Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress.

These are some of the only known COLOR photos from that time period.  I have to admit, it's quite a jolt to see images like this and see how colorful life was.  It wasn't the drab brown, sepia tone and black and white images we've seen.  I guess I always knew people had to be wearing bright colors or were painting buildings vibrant shades but until you see it, it's hard to wrap your head around.

These photos reminded me of movie sets or extras from a period piece movie being filmed today.  Be sure and click on the link above to see all the great pictures.  Just extraordinary.  Enjoy!

14 comments:

Joani said...

The photos were awesome. My grandparents had similar photos.

ladyhawthorne said...

I like how she even has plants in the ground level windowsill. I think the large plant in the garden is tobacco.

kristine barr said...

Wow! those were cool! Did you notice how thin everyone was?

Anonymous said...

Thanks for posting the link--the photos are wonderful. Never really thought about how much you miss by seeing only black and white. In those you don't really notice the dirty and worn clothing, the children's dirty feet, the litter on the ground, the scuffed shoes, etc. Everyting looks so much more realistic.

Kris said...

I see an old automobile through the fence. Must be a road in front. That sure is an eco-friendly building. Thanks for posting it - I, too, never seem to see color photos of that period.

kelli said...

love this

Gammy Tammy said...

Wow!!! What a great find!! Did anyone else notice that there were no smiles from the southern families. Loved the one you chose to post 1st man. Thanks so much for sharing this. The color photos bring the people to life.

1st Man said...

Aren't they great? It's really neat seeing a part of history.

1st Man said...

I guess that's how they added life and probably something practical and useful to their decor. I wondered what that big plant was and now that you say that it does look like a tobacco plant. Very cool!

1st Man said...

YES, I noticed that right away. It's probably all that hard work. And of course no fast food...or processed foods...or junk foods....or soft drinks....or snack foods....ha.

1st Man said...

That's what I thought too, it's more realistic but looks like a movie set or something doesn't it? It's kind of weird. It's real looking and a glimpse like we've never seen before. Like you said, never realized how much we missed by seeing them in black and white. I'm just struck by how colorful it was. Clothing I thought was brown and gray and black is actually red and yellow and purple, ha.

1st Man said...

I didn't notice the car. Cool! Eco friendly before they knew what it meant, ha.

1st Man said...

Thanks! Just thought I'd share it when I saw it.

1st Man said...

I wonder if people even said "say cheese!" before snapping a picture? Maybe it was still somewhat of a novelty for some people?

When I saw that photo, I knew that was the example I had to put up, it was gardens and homesteading, ha.

Thanks!!